candy

Classic Confections: Cadbury Creme Egg

Friday, March 04, 2011

Normally I'm disgusted with how early stores bring out their holiday goodies but when the Valentine's day candies go away and the Easter sweets come out, I rejoice (even if it is two months early). My love for Easter candy centers around the Cadbury Creme Egg, with that delicious milk chocolate shell and creamy fondant center, I can't resist them. According to Cadbury's website, I'm not the only one that is powerless to the creme, about 200 million eggs are sold annually in the UK alone!

Creme Eggs, as we know them today, were introduced in the 1970s but Cadbury actually began making creme filled eggs in 1923. What I find most fascinating about the eggs is the way they are made. According to the Cadbury website:

Cadbury Creme Egg is manufactured by pouring liquid chocolate into a half-egg shaped mould, which is then filled with white fondant and then a dab of yellow fondant to simulate the yolk.  Because the fondant has a greater density than the chocolate, it doesn't mix together but pushes the chocolate outwards, (think Archimedes' theory of displacement when he sat in the bath and shouted "Eureka!").  Two mould halves are closed very quickly and cooled to allow the choclate to set. 



These day, the eggs in the US, like other Cadbury products, are no longer made by Cadbury as Hershey now has the license to manufacture them. In the last few years there has been some controversy over a reduction in the size of the classic egg in the US in Canada. In 2007 the size reduction was noticed in the US and in 2010 Canadians also started to receive the 34 gram egg. Folks in the UK can still buy the original 40 gram egg (lucky!).


While Cadbury Creme Eggs aren't the most old fashioned, they're one of my favorites and an Easter tradition (or should I say addiction?). I love to bite the top off and lick out the cream filling, which generally provokes a disgusted shutter from my boyfriend, he hates the things! It seems that either you
are a devoted Cadbury Creme fan or you find them revolting.

 So, how do you eat yours?
 

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